Viewing call logs and statistics

The ability to view call logs and statistics within the QuickLink StudioManager gives complete management. Call logs can be viewed to report, troubleshoot and more. Including checking the amount of usage on a server, which guest was on when, what resolution was actually being sent and received or for packet loss statistics on a call that dropped out. 

To access call logs, log into the QuickLink StudioManager portal, then click on your account name in the top-left corner.

From the dropdown menu, select View Logs.

This will redirect you to the Call Logs page. 

From this page you can view, filter and search by different fields. A key to the interface and the different options available is as follows:

  • A – Results displayed. By default this will show all call logs associated with your account.
  • B – Search functionality to search results.
  • C – Option to apply a search filter for all logs, customers, servers or users.
  • D – Ability to export all displayed logs to a .csv file.
  • E – Navigate through available pages of results
  • F – Sort your results by the selected column.
  • G – Search by stats of a call. This could be useful if you were looking for calls that went through relay or achieved 1080p resolution.
  • H – Select how many results appear on a page, and view how many entries are available.

Selecting a call log will open the statistics of that selected call. From here you can view stats such as call bandwidth and the audio/video information sent and received.

 

Looking at the stats in a little more detail...

The statistics that you see in your call logs will depend on the type of call in question. What type of room, what types of callers or devices you have make a difference too. No matter what type of call you are looking at, there are some key areas to focus on. We'll look at some of those below. 

The logs are essentially broken down into 3 areas. The first section is more general information about the call on the whole. Some areas to pay attention to would be...

 


callDurationSecs - the total call duration (so far if still active) in seconds
googActualEncBitrate - the actual encoded bitrate
googAvailableReceiveBandwidth - the bandwidth that is available for receiving video data
googAvailableSendBandwidth - the bandwidth that is available for sending video data (room MB)
googBucketDelay - is a measure for Google’s “leaky bucket” strategy for dealing with large frames
googRetransmitBitrate - this allows measuring the bitrate of retransmits if RTX is used. This is usually an indication of packet loss
googTargetEncBitrate - the target bitrate of the the video encoder (room MB)
googTransmitBitrate - the bitrate actually transmitted
bytesReceived - total bytes received 
bytesSent - total bytes sent 
packetsSent - total packets sent 
googLocalCandidateType - describes the local ICE candidate 
googRemoteCandidateType - describes the remote ICE candidate 
googRtt - the round trip time of the last STUN request
googTransportType - specifies the transport type

 

The next paragraph deals with audio and video sent. 


bitsSentPerSecond - audio bits sent 
audioInputLevel - audio level 
bytesSent - audio bytes sent
mediaType - shows you what media type you're looking at 
packetsLost - indicates any packets lost on the send audio 
packetsSent - total audio packets sent 
ssrc - the synchronization source (SSRC) identifier is an unsigned integer value used to identify the stream of RTP packets that this stats object is describing
googCodecName - the audio codec 


bitsSentPerSecond - video bits sent 
bytesSent - video bytes sent 
mediaType - shows you what media type you're looking at 
packetsLost - indicates any video packets lost on the send 
packetsSent - video packets sent 
ssrc - the synchronization source (SSRC) identifier is an unsigned integer value used to identify the stream of RTP packets that this stats object is describing.
googCodecName - the video codec 
googFrameHeightSent - Video frame height 
googFrameRateSent - frame rate 
googFrameWidthSent - video frame width 
googNacksReceived - amount negative acknowledgements received  
googPlisReceived - the number of times the receiver of the stream sent a Picture Loss Indiciation (PLI) packet to the sender, indicating that it had lost some encoded video data for one or more frames
googRtt - the round trip time of the last STUN request

 

And finally audio and video received. These stats are the same as above but on the receive instead of the send. 

 

bitsReceivedPerSecond - audio bits received 
audioOutputLevel - audio level 
bytesReceived - audio bytes received 
mediaType - shows you what media type you're looking at
packetsLost - audio packets lost on the receive side 
packetsReceived - total packets received 
ssrc - the synchronization source (SSRC) identifier is an unsigned integer value used to identify the stream of RTP packets that this stats object is describing
googJitterBufferMs - buffer 
googJitterReceived - jitter received 



bitsReceivedPerSecond - video bits received 
bytesReceived - video bytes received  
mediaType - media type received 
packetsLost - video packets lost 
packetsReceived - total video packets received 
ssrc - the synchronization source (SSRC) identifier is an unsigned integer value used to identify the stream of RTP packets that this stats object is describing

googCodecName - video codec used 
googCurrentDelayMs - It is mainly the latency of the network transfer in chrome 
googFrameHeightReceived - video frame height 
googFrameRateReceived - video frame rate 
googFrameWidthReceived - video frame width 
googJitterBufferMs - buffer 
googNacksSent - amount of negative acknowledgements sent  
googPlisSent - The number of times the receiver of the stream sent a Picture Loss Indiciation (PLI) packet to the sender, indicating that it had lost some encoded video data for one or more frames

Was this article helpful?
1 out of 1 found this helpful
Share it, if you like it.